Beach Slang at the The Cobalt

Monday 23rd, November 2015 / 12:41
By Graeme Wiggins
Beach Slang at the The Cobalt. Photo: Jonathan Glendon

Beach Slang at the The Cobalt.
Photo: Jonathan Glendon

November 10, 2015

VANCOUVER — Partway through Beach Slang’s set, frontman James Alex used an audience member’s cell phone to read an exchange he had with an Instagram commenter who said something to the effect of “oh come see fourteen songs with the same lyrics about freaks and punks getting drunk and feeling young and alive and singing in a basement.” Alex’s response was “No, it’s eighteen songs with the same lyrics about freaks and punks getting drunk and feeling young and alive and singing in a basement.” This sums up Beach Slang’s set quite nicely, except it wasn’t in a basement and they added a bunch of cover tunes. It was exactly what one might want out of their show.

Beach Slang’s bassist was refused entry into Canada due to passport issues, and this forced the band to draft the bassist from openers Lithuania (teaching him the songs in the hour before the show!). Between this and admitted drunkenness, a somewhat improvised set, riff battles, and lots of tuning, the show was a sloppy good time.

The band played a very long set, playing most of their catalogue, as well as ripping covers of the Replacements’ “Bastards of Young” and Jawbreaker’s “Bad Scene, Everyone’s Fault.” They were clearly enjoying themselves and their enthusiasm led to an extended improvised encore, which included a couple more Jawbreaker songs, a Dramarama cover, and a couple songs from Alex’s older band Weston. Alex had opened the set by declaring, “We’re Beach Slang and we’re here to punch you in the heart.” As the encore finished with the dying screams of “Too Late to Die Young,” the crowd filtered out into the rainy evening feeling young, drunk, and alive.

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Alberta

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