Twenty One Pilots, The Zolas at Vogue Theatre

Thursday 17th, December 2015 / 09:38
By Chris Jimenez
Twenty One Pilots at Vogue Theatre. Photo: Steven Shepherd

Twenty One Pilots at Vogue Theatre.
Photo: Steven Shepherd

December 9, 2015

VANCOUVER — A sea of young adults sporting black ski masks and hot pink eyeshadow waited patiently in excitement. The Zolas opened the show with “Invisible,” setting the mood for the night, conversing well, and taking notice of the crowd’s makeup and jokingly saying, “I notice some pink around the crowd’s eyes tonight. Some must be from makeup and others from lining up since yesterday for this show.”

The Zolas did a robust set, engaging the crowd and warming them up both during and between songs. The setlist consisted of eight tracks, with a good balance between chill songs that made the crowd sway from left to right and others that required a bit of energy. However, the crowd reserved most of the night’s jumping and hollering for the main attraction. The Zolas only had a week and a half to prepare for this show due to a cancellation from Echosmith, and they delivered despite time constraints.

Twenty One Pilots at Vogue Theatre. Photo: Steven Shepherd

Twenty One Pilots at Vogue Theatre.
Photo: Steven Shepherd

Twenty One Pilots opened with “HeavyDirtySoul.” The stage setup featured an upright piano/synth to the right and Josh Dun’s elevated drum set up on the left; this left an open platform for Tyler Joseph to perform quick verses and have a light-up microphone descend from the roof Mike Buffer-style. The first song ended with Joseph collapsing straight backwards on the stage, which made for a haunting anticipation for what was to come. On the attire topic, throughout the night the duo changed three times. In the beginning they sported ski masks and skeleton zip-up hoodies that covered their faces. Midway through the set, about the time they played “We Don’t Believe What’s on TV,” Joseph changed into a floral short-sleeve button-up shirt with sunglasses, slightly resembling master Roshi from Dragon Ball Z holding a ukulele. For the remainder of the show, both Dun and Joseph changed into sleeveless black shirts.

Both Joseph and Dun did an immaculate job at performing 17 songs with barely any breaks. They had a well-planned set, allowing the audience to recover by incorporating songs that made the crowd jump with songs had people head bobbing and reciting lightning fast lyrics by heart. A mix of synth beats changed the mood throughout the show from dark on “Polarize” to bright on “The Judge.”

There was no skimping on any theatrics — the lighting was amazing, and the onstage platform they stood on lit up, at times casting a giant shadow of Dun working the drums on the walls. The one downside I noticed was the synth backing track while Joseph moved around, though this did mean that he got to interact more with the audience, making the stage a personal jungle gym. The band members stayed humble throughout the set, appreciating each other and the crowd. The concert ended with giant smoke jets spraying confetti, making the crowd eager for Twenty One Pilots to return in April.

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Alberta

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