Napalmpom Premieres Intimate and Hyperactive Video with IMVERYAPE

Tuesday 25th, April 2017 / 12:05

Our past cover stars Napalmpom are premiering quite an interesting new video today, made by IMVERYAPE. Give the video a play below, and read on for context from the band and IMVERYAPE.

IMVERYAPE PRESENTS: NAPALMPOM from IMVERYAPE on Vimeo.

Napalmpom: “The mid-to-late ’90s era of Much Music instilled confidence in us at a young(-er) age that being a Canadian band could be genuinely important and valued. We obsessively taped episodes of Much East and The Wedge hoping to see videos by Thrush Hermit, Change Of Heart and Slow and wore out our copies of Sloan’s own Intimate and Interactive. 90 minutes dedicated to the music and personalities of a Canadian band? Canada’s Kiss, but with far better songs. Its Beatles, but without the baggage. We dreamt of having our very own ‘leave the Much studios to sing a tune in Speaker’s Corner,’ as Chris Murphy did on ‘Deeper Than Beauty.’

Since then, well, it’s become apparent that we’d never be given that same platform afforded equally to great and awful music of the time. So, with the knowledge that no one will ever care about our band as much as we do, we took it on ourselves to pair up with IMVERYAPE to make our very own.”

IMVERYAPE: “Being a very vocal uber-fan of the Unconditional Love Of Napalmpom, I had been eager to work with Napalmpom. Once the band, the studio, and I finally lined up a time to shoot something, I knew the next task was to think of some element of fun for the video to match their energy. Fortunately, the band was quick to offer the idea of a play on Intimate and Interactive called “Intimate and Hyperactive,” and I was immediately sold. As we are all around the same age, mid-nineties MuchMusic played a huge role in our childhoods. Having a chance to revisit that was exciting. I can still remember running home to watch recorded episodes of RapCity, or not leaving the house on Friday until I found out what was number one on the Top 20 Countdown. This little video, on top of featuring the music wizardry of a great band, tries to capture just a little morsel of that nostalgia (albeit in a no-budget, zero-production-value kind of way).”
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