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Spoon Live at Malkin Bowl

Wednesday 06th, September 2017 / 11:26
By James Olson

Spoon – Photo by Sasha Stevanoska

Malkin Bowl
September 2 2017

VANCOUVER – The discerning music fan couldn’t have picked a better night to enjoy a live performance in Stanley Park. A blisteringly hot late summer day slowly cooled into a crisp and definitely more agreeable evening for the wide demographic of folks in attendance at Spoon’s stop at the Malkin Bowl.

Spoon – Photo by Sasha Stevanoska

The Kentucky based garage rockers White Reaper were energetic and upbeat. Vocalist/guitarist Tony Esposito and company barreled through relentlessly fun numbers off of their pair of enjoyable albums. Bassist Sam Wilkerson and the band’s keyboardist were entertaining to watch as they bounced around the stage. It might have been the heat, but you could tell that the majority of the crowd was in attendance for Spoon. White Reaper were a great warm up act but they didn’t steal the show by any means.

Spoon – Photo by Sasha Stevanoska

The sun had all but set as Austin art rockers Spoon took the stage. Their light show became more and more atmospheric and electrifying as the darkness of night shrouded the Malkin Bowl. The band was largely backlit which served to amplify the cinematic feel of songs like “Can I Sit Next to You” and “The Underdog.” Spoon covered a lot of ground in their hour long set, playing enough earlier material to satisfy older fans while performing their best songs from their last two albums. The seamlessly executed transitions between numbers was a testament to the band’s professionalism as a seasoned live act. “Do I Have To Talk You Into It” morphing into “Inside Out” served as a perfect one-two punch to start off the set. Elsewhere, an extended keyboard solo by Alex Fischel was pure space rock magic worthy of Pink Floyd’s Richard Wright. Britt Daniel was positively magnetic as a frontman, at his theatrical peak arising from a corpse-like posture during “I Ain’t the One.”

Spoon – Photo by Sasha Stevanoska

For one of the last shows of the season for the Malkin Bowl, Spoon put on what might be one of the best performances of the summer.

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