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This Month in Film – December 2018

This Month in Film – December 2018

By Brendan Lee Mortal Engines – December 14 From the pen of one of cinema’s all-time greats, Peter Jackson (Lord…

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Architects Live at the Vogue Theatre

Monday 05th, March 2018 / 17:50
By Brendan Lee

Photo by Lindsey Blane

Vogue Theatre
March 1st, 2018

VANCOUVER – There’s not much worse than being forced to say goodbye.

Brighton UK’s, Architects, have been through a cataclysmic journey of emotion the past year-and-a-half. They’ve gone from the brink of calling-it-quits at the loss of songwriter, lead guitarist, and brother, Tom Searle, to an inspirational rejuvenation that’s been carried forward with non-stop touring and nights spent spilling their souls in front of crowds are thankful for the band to soldier on. Knowing that, Thursday night at the Vogue was as special and spine-snappingly heavy as a show could ever get.

Counterparts – Photo by Lindsey Blane

Stick To Your Guns – Photo by Lindsey Blane

Architects is, perhaps, the pinnacle of the metalcore genre at the moment, and it’s no surprise the choice of supporting acts were of such high quality. Counterparts and Stick to Your Guns kicked off the night, each with their own unique brands of melodic-hardcore, and had the crowd spin-kicking, feeling things, from the very outset.

Photo by Lindsey Blane

From there, amidst a house inflated with smoke, white spots set to slice the haze, and the crowd pumped full of atmosphere, Architects began their unholy confession. Eerie ambient noise held the crowd in stasis for a prolonged intro, before, ‘A Match Made in Heaven’s’ shady opening riff turned the pit to a frenzy, and, vocalist, Sam Carter’s banshee screams kicked in, never faltered from there until the bitter end.

Photo by Lindsey Blane

At the edge of every moment, every lyric, was an omnipresent hint of impending sadness, like a wave about to break. After spending most of the set doubled over the mic beneath all-encompassing screams, Carter opened up before the final song. Amidst chants of Tom’s name, he reminded the crowd whose songs they were playing, and just how thankful he was to hear them still sing his words.

Seeing Architects play live is like a cleanse for the soul. Though melancholy and hatred are front and center with the bands lyrical content – and unavoidable given the circumstances — almost equally present was a sense of relief. There’s little harder than having to say goodbye. But by digging in their heels and using the stage as a little piece of therapy each night, Architects have found new light and treated goodbye as just another chance to keep on saying hello.

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