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Moshe Kasher Intellectualizes the Immature

Moshe Kasher Intellectualizes the Immature

By Graeme Wiggins VANCOUVER – Comedy exists in a precarious space in the public forum. On one hand, it relies…

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Watain
 Live At the Rickshaw

Thursday 15th, March 2018 / 17:09
By Brayden Turenne

Photo by Darrole Palmer

Rickshaw Theatre
March 12th, 2018

In the wake of their new album, “Trident Wolf Eclipse” the satanic commando’s Watain, made sure that Vancouver was not left unravaged in their campaign across North America. Accompanied by worthy auxiliaries in sonic warfare in both Destroyer 666 and Canada’s own, Revenge, March 12 was a date to be feared.

Revenge opened the night in a seething blast of unrelenting hatred that has won this band from Edmonton, Alberta a kind of inverted superstar status in the extreme underground. J. Read becomes wholly inhuman behind a drum kit, as guitarist, Vermin, and bassist, Haasiophis vocally clash on stage, together emulating a state of total cataclysm.

Photo by Darrole Palmer

It would be wrong to say that Revenge warmed up the audience, but rather shocked them into submission, leaving Destroyer 666 to build the crowd back up with a welcome blend of blackened thrash that set heads banging furiously. The band, showing their stripes as true veterans of the stage, won the crowd over through a combination of masterful playing and joyous, old school heavy metal charisma.

Photo by Darrole Palmer

As was promised by their reputation, Watain put on a show of musical and theatrical extremity. It was less a concert and more a ritual, and the stage was turned into a shrine of candles, trident wolf banners and skeletal remains, which augmented Watain’s performance with an intoxicating atmosphere. The band played a balanced array of songs old and new, from “Furor Diabolicus” to “The Serpent’s Chalice”. Much like Destroyer 666, Watain know how to inhabit a stage to its fullest, but in a different way entirely, opting for an aura of dread and danger than simple adrenaline.

Like a trident itself, the night was a three pronged assault on the senses, with each band displaying a varying sound that resulted in a stellar show.