Whistler-based Snowboard icon Mark Tremblay Revisits The Mountain After Monumental Recovery

Monday 07th, January 2019 / 07:00
By Jessie Foster

Photo by Ben Girardi

Whistler/Blackcomb’s own mountain man Mark Tremblay give us the rundown on snowboarding. This means everything from filming, injuries, travelling, sledding, music and general adventure. When it comes to sending it in the backcountry, Tremblay’s got us covered with his free-formed style that still means total business. His riding could be compared to the mullet of the sport. In the front he’s got it figured out through accomplishments such as riding with the Wildcats crew in 2016, pushing his limits around BC and working with Absinthe films more recently this year. However, on the backside he’s got this laidback demeanour of having a great time on the mountain and letting his hair down for some good old-fashioned French-Canadian forceless fun.

“BC is quite the place to be snowboarding. It’s unpredictable; sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s bad, but when it’s good it can be really good,” says Tremblay. Growing up, he was lucky to have a family that were avidly dedicated to skiing, and even had a chalet in Mont Valin in Québec. It was there that he grew up on a snowboard. He dusted off his chops for the first time when he was just three years old, and then by the time he was seven he finally owned his very first board. He remembers watching snowboarders hitting the park there from the chairlift and deciding that was what he wanted to do with his life. He’s since been true to that word.

“Me, I had to work and always really love to snowboard. I just kept working to snowboard sort of my whole life, and I think you can tell when you see me ride. I think it’s more raw, less structured,” says Tremblay.

He has been around the area for eight years after moving away from Québec to pursue riding in the Rocky Mountains. Whistler and Blackcomb’s painstakingly massive surrounding areas provide limitless possibilities for exploration, whether through their terrain parks, hiking or just goofing around with mates. “Feel like I’m just starting to poke into some zones here, it’s so big. It’s huge, you probably need 10 years to explore, if you did it every day.”

Tremblay overshot the landing at a prestigious SuperPark event in Mammoth two years ago. The now 25-year-old blew out his ACL, MCL and meniscus on his final day there of throwing down. “Didn’t break anything but I compressed so much that I burst my eardrum,” says Tremblay. After a couple years of rehab and strengthening the contours of his leg he’s back riding steady.
Riding with the Wildcats crew before his accident, he had the chance to film with some of his favourite snowboarders that he would watch growing up, such as Iikka Backstrom and Devun Walsh. “Was pretty much my first opportunity to be filming backcountry with like a legit group, so I’m really stoked on that.” This season he’s looking forward to doing more riding with Absinthe films, who put in the work to film the biggest names in snowboarding every year.

While he’s not a huge fan of country music, he says he pretty much listens to it all. That said, Tremblay’s no stranger to reggae and hip-hop. With smaller budgets floating around the snowboard industry than back in the day, he says purchasing the perfect song for a segment of a video isn’t always completely tangible. He would love to get the chance to pick the song for his section, if copyrights weren’t so crazy.

Throughout all the shredding, he still finds time to kick back with his season pass to Scandinave Spa where he has been doing promotional work for the unlimited excuse to go soak his bod in one of their luxurious pools. Right now he is working hard to get his truck up to snuff for a season full of sledding, shralping and all around tomfooleries. Make sure to look out for Tremblay this year as he surely has more than one trick up his baggy sleeves.